Baptism, sprinkle or immersion?


I want to start this discussion off by quoting 2 Corinthians 10:4,5 (For the weapons of our warfare are not carnal, but mighty through God to the pulling down of strongholds;) 5 Casting down imaginations, and every high thought that exalteth itself against the knowledge of God, and bringing into captivity every thought to the obedience of Christ;

Do you know how important it is that we exercise our obedience in everything, and at all times unto Christ Jesus?

I want to share in my baptism story. I grew up in a Lutheran church in Williamston, Michigan in America. I was baptized by sprinkling as an infant in the tradition of the Lutheran faith. When I was 19 years old I was in the United States Marine Corps in South Carolina, in the US. I was led to Jesus by another Christian Marine. I asked Jesus to come into my heart and became a born again Christian as the bible tells us we need to do. (John 3:5 ) This happened in July of 1975.

So now I was a born again Christian and the question of baptism immediately came up and I knew I had been baptized as an infant, but the baptism I had been informed about was called a believers baptism. So, wanting to be an obedient child I immediately started praying about it . There was this Lieutenant Colonel I knew who would baptize people and upon meeting him at a place we used to worship at called The Light House, which it was on a Monday night. He asked me to give him a call on Wednesday. So, I did. He informed me he was very busy and he didn't know when he could find the time. I had decided to commit it to God as I had done other things and so I prayed and said, "Lord, I was baptized as an infant in the Lutheran church and so if this believers baptism I was told about is important, then your going to have to arrange it.

Keep in mind I was a baby Christian yet and really still on the milk of the Word. That weekend, which was the next Sunday, a non-Christian friend asked me to go to Huntington Island Beach with him swimming and I of course, said yes. The weather was very hot because it was July and on the way there I drank a beer, which happened to be on an empty stomach. By the time we got to the beach I could feel that the beer had relaxed me a bit and I felt pretty good. We parked his Volkswagen Beetle and I said I was going to go get wet. He said he was going to find a place on the beach to sit.

I wanted to cool off so I proceeded to the water. I threw down my towel on the beach and walked to the shore, as I looked up to my shock, standing straight in front of me out in the water was the colonel and his family. I knew, and He knew too that it was not a coincidence. I walked straight to him and after a very brief talk, He baptized me there, and there were a lot of people that watched. I have to say it was a memorable experience because the first thing I noticed when I came up out of the water was my complete sobriety. I felt no residual affects from the one beer I drank. I thanked him and walked to my friend on the beach and he questioned me about what just took place and so I told him the story.


The bible is not a paradox, it is in fact in-errant! The sooner it is realized, the more obedient it can influence us to be. Everything that was told in the bible was for our example! The bible doesn't say when Jesus got sprinkled the Holy Spirit in the form of a dove came down from heaven and sat on his shoulders.


Matthew 3:16,17 says And Jesus, when he was baptized, went up straightaway out of the water: and, lo, the heavens were opened unto him, and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove, and lighting upon him; 17 And lo a voice from heaven, saying, this is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.

Now, I want to give you another example of a washing, because when we get baptized it represents the washing of the old nature and putting on the new man. When Pilate in Matthew 27:24 was under pressure before the Pharisees and the people, it says this,  24 When Pilate saw that he could prevail nothing, but rather a tumult was made, he took water, and washed his hands before the multitude, saying, I am innocent of the blood of this just person; see ye to it.

Let me remind you that it was in a place where they didn't have a faucet to turn on if they even had that then, which I doubt, so Pilate had to put his hands in a basin of water and dip them under completely immersing them to signify washing them. So Pilate was in essence doing something that was an accepted practice because he did not want to be held responsible for the blood of Christ.

I have heard some people say,"well but for health reasons, some people can't get immersed." I beg to differ with you. If it takes the love of two or three other Christians to lift them up off their bed or wheel chair and place them in the water and be dipped then it should be so.

It just might be that Christ will not only wash them clean but they might be completely healed in the process. What does the bible say about baptism? What does it say about the washing of our sins (forgiveness) that Jesus gives. It saves us from death, and more often than not, Jesus healed people by saying thy sins are forgiven thee, not  just you are healed get up and walk.

Here's another very good example in John 3:23 And John also was baptizing in Aenon near to Salim, because there was much water there: and they came and were baptized.

Read Acts 8:38 about the Eunuch's baptism.

You know there was always water around in pots or pitchers and if just a few little droplets off the ends of my fingers can signify baptism then why did they make sure they went somewhere were there was much water. They could have baptized anywhere with a little water!

How about reading John 5:4, what about just sprinkling a few drops of water on the man. Did anyone think of that? No, they had to step down into the water.

The story below depicts one of the most lunatic things that could be concerning baptism. The Mormon church baptizing dead people. The bible is clear that baptism is only for people who are living and willing to identify themselves with Christ through baptism. Baptizing dead people is about as stupid as wearing a life jacket in a car so you don't drown.

Elie Wiesel calls on Mitt Romney to make Mormon Church stop proxy baptisms of Jews

By Peter Wallsten and , Published: February 15

Nobel-laureate Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel and a top official from the Simon Wiesenthal Center said Tuesday that Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney should use his stature in the Mormon Church to block its members from posthumously baptizing Jewish victims of the Holocaust.

Their comments followed reports that Mormons had baptized the deceased parents of Wiesenthal, the late Holocaust survivor and Nazi-hunter. Wiesel appeared in a church database used to identify potential subjects of baptisms.

A spokeswoman for Romney said his campaign would not comment, directing all inquiries to church officials.

Posthumous baptisms of non-Mormons are a regular practice in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Members believe the ritual creates the possibility for the deceased to enter their conception of Heaven.

Individual members can submit names, usually of deceased relatives, for proxy baptisms. The church has tried to improve its technology to block the process from including Jewish Holocaust victims. In this case, officials blamed an unidentified person.

“We sincerely regret that the actions of an individual member of the Church led to the inappropriate submission of these names,” spokesman Michael Purdy said in a statement. “These submissions were clearly against the policy of the Church. We consider this a serious breach of our protocol and we have suspended indefinitely this person’s ability to access our genealogy records.”

The practice of baptizing Holocaust victims has long been offensive to Jews. After years of negotiations, Mormon officials have prohibited posthumous baptisms of Jewish Holocaust victims.

There is no indication that Romney has ever been involved in the proxy baptism of a Holocaust victim. Asked if he had ever participated in posthumous baptisms, Romney told Newsweek in 2007 that “I have in my life, but I haven’t recently.”

The controversy could put Romney in the uncomfortable position of having to directly address Mormon theology, a topic he has so far avoided in his current campaign. Many evangelical voters have expressed skepticism about Mormonism, and Romney, a former lay leader in the church, has rarely discussed his experiences in the church.

Romney “is now the most famous and important Mormon in the country,” Wiesel said. “I’m not saying it’s his fault, but once he knows, morally he must respond. . . . He should come out and say, ‘Stop it.’ ”

Wiesel, 83, is one of several Jewish leaders who have directly negotiated the issue with the Mormon Church since the mid-1990s.



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